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Shipping with Canada PostShipping with Canada Post

MashinMashinIl y a 1 moisAsk MFC
Hello fellow canadian MFC users,

I've been going through some changes in my mindset and livelihood lately.
This has brought me to reassess my hobby.
I want to get rid of a lot of my collection but I have never sold anything before.

I would like to hear about some of your experiences with shipping from Canada Post.
In particular, I would like to understand the full process.
How to get a shipping quote?
How to get your items weighted? Can I do it myself or is it regulated?
Do you get your boxes from Canada Post? If so, do you add this cost to the shipping cost you ask from the buyer?

Any information is appreciated.
I would like to know as much as possible before setting things up as I don't want to clumsily walk in with a bunch of risqué figures. ;)

Thanks for everything and stay awesome!
609 vues • 14 commentaires

Commentaires14

2pt
nammy (Il y a 1 mois) #32657851Oh, you can buy kitchen scales at walmart for like $20. I recently had to replace my old scale...
That's where I got my digital one too. Cheap and accurate enough.
Il y a 1 mois
1pt
Oh, you can buy kitchen scales at walmart for like $20. I recently had to replace my old scale...
Il y a 1 mois
3pt
Hey there.

Most people have answered the obvious questions. Shipping quotes are easy on Canada Post's website if you have weight and lxwxh. You can weigh boxes yourself and even buy the labels online. In fact, I never go to Canada Post in person to estimate or buy labels anymore. I do it all at home. And I never buy shipping materials at Canada Post because they are so expensive. Buy them at Walmart or Costco or a dollar store.

I've been selling online for years now (I tend to buy and sell, buy and sell, as I move on from a particular part of collecting. I've been spending the last year+ selling all my post Rise of Cobra GI Joes (almost 10 years of joes) for example) so I can give you a few things I've learned over time:
  • Buy a cheap but digital (not analog) kitchen scale (one that goes to at least 5 kg) and be sure to have a digital bathroom scale if you might be selling over 5 kg combined shipping at some point. In my experience, although not "official", the weight is extremely close to what Canada Post's scales do. I usually buffer 5-10 grams. So if it says on my scale that the item is 0.5 kg exactly, I try to remove materials or cut down flaps to get it safely under weight.
  • Of course get a good measuring tape. You need l x w x h for estimates particularly once you leave small packet realm.
  • Get a Canada Post Venture One account. It lets you buy labels online and gives you a discount on almost every label. Easy to sign up online. Required for PayPal and Shippo labels anyway, so you might as well get it over with.
  • If use paypal for receiving money, print the labels through them (I think you need to link your VentureOne account). There's often a bigger discount than Canada Post's website.
  • If you can, use Shippo as well. I've not had luck using it independently of e-bay, so sometimes I keep making new labels off the same linked purchases. But shippo has even bigger shipping discounts than just PayPal and lets you buy third party insurance for small packet items for a reasonable price.
  • If you are selling things under 2 cm thick domestically and want to ship Canada Post oversized lettermail, buy the "slot of doom" as I call it. Official name is lettermail sizing template (www.canadapost....). It will save you fights at Canada Post if you can verify it slides through beforehand. It's not so important anymore since Light Packet international/US disappeared so you may not need it.
  • Canada Post charges non-small packet items (like every domestic parcel or expedited parcel to the US) by volumetric weight. A big box but light item can be expensive. Size is just as important as weight. So get used to resizing them... For me, what I do to keep weight down is resize the box, and if the box is too small, I put the box in half a size #6 bubble envelope to make sure the item is big enough not to get "lost" easily by mail handlers.
  • For boxes, it can get expensive to buy your own. I can't even remember the last time I bought one. I reuse them and resize them myself. I'd recommend getting a good straight edge (like a metal ruler) and a box cutter to score the cardboard and resize boxes yourself. For example, my kids eat waffles and I buy the family size waffle box frequently so I keep a storage of those and resize them if needed.
  • Hoard bubblewrap from your own purposes and buy bubblewrap in bulk if you are selling your collection. I buy the biggest box at Walmart. I buy packing tape at costco. I hoard packing peanuts too, but I don't use them much anymore since I have to resize boxes all the time.
  • Be upfront about all fees and include as many generic ones within the cost of the item not as extra "shipping and handling" fees. I find it better to either include a $1 handling fee in all sales on e-bay and it distributes the cost of generic materials. If you are buying individual boxes, I'd recommend including it in the price of the item and not put it as a shipping or handling fee. It will just frustrate people who receive the item later to see a $15 shipping charge and if they calculate it themselves and see it was really $10 based on weight (it frustrated me in the past on purchases myself).

A couple other things about shipping methods via Canada Post:
  • It should go without saying, but when you list items, always say shipping is extra, at least until you get used to estimating beforehand and can set a price that is safely high enough to include all possible shipping locations.
  • Domestic options SUCK for small items. Inexperienced buyers will be frustrated, but unless you can get it under 2 cm, shipping gets ridiculous, but at least it is always trackable and with at least $100 insurance.
  • Shipping to the US is only cheap for the buyer if you use small packet. But small packet is NOT trackable, so only use it if you are willing to buy third party insurance (Ship Insure / Shippo) or the item is cheap enough that you can be ready for a refund if there is a PayPal claim against you. OF the hundreds of sales I've made, I've only had a few claims for unreceived items. Each one gives a frustrating feeling.
  • Avoid small packet ground (it's not offered for the US anyway). Only use ground methods if they are trackable. Buyers become extremely impatient and ground can take 8 weeks or more around the world. You need protection for yourself.
  • Be open to selling around the world eventually. The vast majority of my sales, and the most money I get, tends to be from international (non US/CAD) sales. The reason being, if you sell on e-bay anyway, almost all US sellers use e-bays Global Shipping Program, which is ridiculously expensive for international buyers (charging domestic US shipping + international shipping + import fees all at once). As a Canadian selling with calculated/actual shipping costs, it makes my items super competitive outside of Canada/US. If you're new, it's okay to be nervous. Mandate a trackable method if the prices get above $100 usually. Ship only to countries that have third party insurance available (or only ship via trackable methods to the rest). If you use Shippo, it's usually quite cheap to insure the package through a third party linked with Shippo to most major countries. There are certain countries with really bad importing structures (Italy, Brazil, Israel jump to mind from personal experiences) that inexperienced buyers will not be aware of that they start jumping for PayPal claims when they just need to wait longer.

Whew!
Il y a 1 mois
0pt
Not sure if it's just the Canada Post by my place, but they kinda let the packages get banged up. I remember sending an Amiibo to a friend somewhere in the States, and told the postal service (as well as leaving a large 'fragile/do not bend' sticker on it) to absolutely not bend or bang it.They hand no boxes for whatever reason, so I had to use one of those packages people use to send charms or whatever.
When she go it, not only was the top part bent like heck, the Amiibo was banged around so much the plastic was pushed in and caused the amiibo to be loose and shake around :/
So be sure to use a good box with good cushioning/protection.

Other than that and the expensive shipping cost, they were really good with communication and tracking the package.
Il y a 1 mois
1pt
Thanks everyone!
You've all been a great help.
It'll take a while before I start selling.
But I feel more confidant now.
Il y a 1 mois
2pt
There's a shipping calculator on the Canada Post site that you can use to get an idea of how much the package will cost to ship, where you put in the dimensions of the package and the weight and it gives you all your available options. If you don't have a scale you can use to get the weight, though, that'll make the estimate a bit harder. It'll be weighed when you bring it to the post office anyway, so no need to worry about that too much. When you go to the post office you can give them your box dimensions if you've already measured it, but keep in mind that although the shipping calculator online allows both metric and imperial units, the post office hardware all uses metric only.

I tend to get my boxes from them when I don't have a box I can use at home (the medium box is the perfect size for single Nendos) and when I sell on Ebay I add a little extra to the shipping fee to help cover supplies for shipping. I highly recommend a good layer of bubble wrap around the figure box, and also make sure all the empty space in the box is filled for extra cushioning and to make sure the figure doesn't move around too much. Fill it up with paper or packing peanuts or something similar. Also, a word of advice as a Canada Post employee: resist the temptation to write "fragile" on your boxes... some warehouse workers and delivery drivers WILL take that as a challenge! (Let's just say I've seen some shit since I started working for Canada Post.) Just make sure they're packaged well and you should be fine.

I limit my sales to Canada and the US because shipping further that becomes too expensive, so that's something to keep in mind. Most of my sales tend to come from the US anyway. I always send everything out with tracking for my customers' peace of mind. Anything you send as a package/parcel within Canada will have tracking regardless of how you send it (regular/express/whatever), but for the US you'll have to go for Tracked Packet and other options beyond that - the well-loved Small Packet Air option has no tracking. Nendoroids and other small figures will fit the Small Packet/Tracked Packet limits easily, but scale figures often end up being too big even if they fit the weight requirement - I've usually gone for Expedited shipping when sending scales to the US and haven't had issues with it so far. I pass on the clerk's delivery estimate to my customer as well, to give them an idea of when to expect the package - they appreciate it.
Il y a 1 mois
1pt
If you want to calculate weight, a pair of kitchen scales is usually pretty accurate. If the parcel won't rest on the scales, then use a plate/bowl, and tare the scale prior to placing your package upon the plate/bowl. Your parcel will get weighed at the post office for them to calculate postage, but weighing and measuring your packed item will avoid any surprises at the PO.

I'm in the UK, so we don't have flat rate boxes - we have weight bands and sizes.

When packing items, ensure any spare space is taken up by packing material (scrunched paper, bubble wrap, packing peanuts) and try not to have any part of the figure's box touching the edge of the packing box. This will help your item not get damaged in transit, if the box is handled roughly. Fragile stickers don't do anything.
Il y a 1 mois
1pt
Been using CP to sell and all the buyers received it no problems, use the shipping calculator on their site, my figure mostly only weight less than 2 kgs when i shipped them which is around $13~$20, like someone said get buyer from US and Canada other countries can get expensive unless they're the 31 countries that able to use Tracked Packet service from CP, for boxes i just recycle old boxes and bunch of flyers for padding might as well use them free supply right there lol
Il y a 1 mois
2pt
Canada Post gets very expensive beyond local shipping. Shipping rates will become challenging anywhere beyond Eastern Canada. Canada Post tends to do their boxes by size addition to weight; therefore, try to pack it tight and light as possible giving yours and receiving post officer treats package with care.

If you planning to sell to USA market and if you living in really big border towns like Montreal, then just use Chitchat forwarder to ship using USPS to USA. Use Japanese SAL boxes and priority mail means half price of Canada Post. This makes selling to USA feasible without postage taking lion's share.

Canada Post small packet to USA is competitive until like 2lb, after that it is too expensive. That's only enough for lighter single figure shipment like Kotobukiya or Wave. They don't allow 3lb-4lb unfortunately.
Il y a 1 mois
2pt
Look into their flat rate boxes. They include a box and shipping inside Canada (except some of the Yukon/NWT/Nunavut) as long as the item fits properly inside the box and doesn't go over the weight limit.
Il y a 1 mois
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