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Figurine PhotographyStarting out

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  • 13 réponses
  • BlinKyRegular Boarder
    BlinKy
    • Non
    • 9
    • Il y a 6 ans
    • 4
    • Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Il y a 6 ans
    So I'm starting out with a Nikon D32 with a AF-S Nikkor 18-55mm lens. I really don't have much experience with cameras in general so I'm mostly just experimenting with it. Here are a few shots (PICTURE #580202)(PICTURE #579590)(PICTURE #579541)[I don't have a steady hand >.<] two of these I messed around the colors and lighting with gimp. I believe I'm doing an alright job, just need more practice. Right now I'm looking for post processing tips. I'm very clueless on it, and I really want to give my photos some flair
  • AsakoOm nom nomRegular Boarder
    Asako
    • Non
    • 19
    • Il y a 8 ans
    • 170
    • Australia
    Il y a 6 ans
    Learn how to use your camera before learning how to postprocess. The actual image itself is far more key than any PP you want to do, and experimenting is he best way to learn. Just work out how aperture and shutter speed (with or without EV +/-) affect your images.

    As for unsteady hands, get a tripod of some sort. Whether a small one like a gorillapod, or a fully fledged one. Anything that can hold the camera still. Even just resting it on something solid can work for tabletop photography if you don't want to cough up dollars for a real tripod; beanbags are a common camera propping tool.

    What sort of post tips are you after, anyway?
  • BlinKyRegular Boarder
    BlinKy
    • Non
    • 9
    • Il y a 6 ans
    • 4
    • Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Il y a 6 ans • MàJ Il y a 6 ans
    as of right now anything would be helpful. Shutter speed ... I do believe that is the ISO setting. Trying to get very crisp photo should be a start

    Edit:So I started fiddling with the shutter speed and so far I'm getting much better results

    picture/580799&...
    picture/580798&...
  • WildstarVery Important Boarder
    Wildstar
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    • 19
    • Il y a 11 ans
    • 594
    • Portugal
    Il y a 6 ans
    No, shutter speed nas nothing to do with the ISO.

    Read this lifehacker.com/...
    Read it.
    Japanese radishes are usually attached to the secret in substitution for the weapon of the version.
  • BlinKyRegular Boarder
    BlinKy
    • Non
    • 9
    • Il y a 6 ans
    • 4
    • Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Il y a 6 ans
    Wildstar (Il y a 6 ans)No, shutter speed nas nothing to do with the ISO.

    Read this lifehacker.com/...
    Read it.
    So.... ISO is light sensitivity, Aperture controls how much light you let in and alters the depth of field (low=shallow high=deep focus). I'll mark this link for further reference
  • AsakoOm nom nomRegular Boarder
    Asako
    • Non
    • 19
    • Il y a 8 ans
    • 170
    • Australia
    Il y a 6 ans
    For figures, or any still object/product photography, you generally want ISO on absolute minimum (80-100 for most cameras, possibly 200 for entry level cameras without fake expanded sensitivity) which may well lead to long exposures, which is why you need a tripod. You can play with aperture for your depth of field, but for most figures you don't need anything beyond about f/10, or below ~5.6 may end up leaving some parts out of focus, really depends on the lens, the figure and how close you are -- also, the look you are going for. Thus why experimentation and practice is in order. I use f/5.6-10 for most of my shots but sometimes I want shallower, or deeper.

    Keep in mind, higher apertures will show up dust/grime/marks on your lens/sensor, too. But if you only have the starter kit lens and aren't taking it off, sensor dust is likely to be a non-issue, but you need to make sure the lens has nothing on it. I hope you have some lens cloths or similar (clean cotton shirt/etc will do, as long as it is properly clean). Last thing you want to do is scratch your lens dragging a bit of grit across it.
  • BlinKyRegular Boarder
    BlinKy
    • Non
    • 9
    • Il y a 6 ans
    • 4
    • Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Il y a 6 ans
    Asako (Il y a 6 ans)For figures, or any still object/product photography, you generally want ISO on absolute minimum (80-100 for most cameras, possibly 200 for entry level cameras without fake expanded sensitivity) which may well lead to long exposures, which is why you need a tripod. You can play with aperture for your depth of field, but for most figures you don't need anything beyond about f/10, or below ~5.6 may end up leaving some parts out of focus, really depends on the lens, the figure and how close you are -- also, the look you are going for. Thus why experimentation and practice is in order. I use f/5.6-10 for most of my shots but sometimes I want shallower, or deeper.

    Keep in mind, higher apertures will show up dust/grime/marks on your lens/sensor, too. But if you only have the starter kit lens and aren't taking it off, sensor dust is likely to be a non-issue, but you need to make sure the lens has nothing on it. I hope you have some lens cloths or similar (clean cotton shirt/etc will do, as long as it is properly clean). Last thing you want to do is scratch your lens dragging a bit of grit across it.
    Ok I will keep all of this in mind. Thanks. I'll inspect my lens and such before use. I always disassemble it and place it in a carry case.
  • 4Arnd4ア一ンドAdministrator
    4Arnd
    • Non
    • 27
    • Il y a 8 ans
    • 2,482
    • United Kingdom
    Il y a 6 ans
    Lens(es) well worth the investment getting a clear filter for them (Hoya Digital filter for example). Keeps the front clean, will be cheaper to replace, if you scratch them by accident or, ( I hope not) you drop the camera/lens and the corner may get damaged.

    Cleaning, try not to use anything other than a good lens cloth and a purpose lens brush (with the little air bag attached). Something like this - www.amazon.com/...
    Anything else may cause harm to your lens. A tiny sandcorn caught in your shirt is all it takes to scratch up the glass.
    http://myfigurecollection.net/pics/b/mfc180x80.png . https://en.facebookbrand.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/FB-fLogo-Blue-broadcast-2.png . Twitter .
  • WildstarVery Important Boarder
    Wildstar
    • Non
    • 19
    • Il y a 11 ans
    • 594
    • Portugal
    Il y a 6 ans
    BlinKy (Il y a 6 ans) I always disassemble it and place it in a carry case.Don't do this! You should only take out the lens when you want to use another one. Every time you take it off you let dust inside the camera (it's not a big deal that you've been doing it, but you shouldn't do it again).
    Japanese radishes are usually attached to the secret in substitution for the weapon of the version.
  • fishcakeRegular Boarder
    fishcake
    • Non
    • 15
    • Il y a 6 ans
    • 5
    Il y a 6 ans
    I've shot using the same camera for years in wind, dust, dirt, and rain, and only have 2 visible specks of sensor dust to worry about (plus, they stay in the same place so they're easy to clone out). I wouldn't be too paranoid about changing lenses. Your camera is meant to be used, not babied.

    As far as improving your photography, the first step is to learn the basics of exposure (it's really intuitive math and physics). Once you have a handle on how and why shutter speed and aperture affect the image you capture, you can start thinking about how you construct and compose your shots. In broad strokes, you're looking for nice soft lighting (such as from a window or sunset) that doesn't cast ugly shadows over your subject as well as a background that isn't distracting.

    How you post process depends on what software you use and your workflow. If you don't shoot in RAW, you'll want to nail the white balance as you shoot to avoid color casts that are very difficult to correct in JPEG. I find that a simple levels/curves adjustment suffices in most cases and these options should be available in most imaging programs. You'll obviously want to experiment with these settings since it's hard to explain them in text but it should become quickly apparent what they do. In general you'll want to bring the shadow and highlight limits on the levels tool in towards the center but avoid blowing out your highlights or clipping your shadows and adjust from there.
  • LeukemioRegular Boarder
    Leukemio
    • Non
    • 11
    • Il y a 8 ans
    • 18
    • Miri Malaysia
    Il y a 6 ans
    if you are using a Nikon, first thing I would ask you to do is to read the entire 6XX pages of Manual.

    Even I just bought a D600 I still read the manual. It's amazing. Nikon manual has very good examples in it, explaining everything you want to know.
    Photographer in caffeine
  • AsakoOm nom nomRegular Boarder
    Asako
    • Non
    • 19
    • Il y a 8 ans
    • 170
    • Australia
    Il y a 6 ans
    Leukemio (Il y a 6 ans)if you are using a Nikon, first thing I would ask you to do is to read the entire 6XX pages of Manual.

    Even I just bought a D600 I still read the manual. It's amazing. Nikon manual has very good examples in it, explaining everything you want to know.


    This should go for any brand, really. All manufacturers have pretty good manuals, in my experience (Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax). Though there are also magic lantern books you can get to go in to more depth about cameras, in most cases, the manual is more than enough.
  • LeukemioRegular Boarder
    Leukemio
    • Non
    • 11
    • Il y a 8 ans
    • 18
    • Miri Malaysia
    Il y a 6 ans
    Asako (Il y a 6 ans)Leukemio (Il y a 6 ans)if you are using a Nikon, first thing I would ask you to do is to read the entire 6XX pages of Manual.

    Even I just bought a D600 I still read the manual. It's amazing. Nikon manual has very good examples in it, explaining everything you want to know.


    This should go for any brand, really. All manufacturers have pretty good manuals, in my experience (Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax). Though there are also magic lantern books you can get to go in to more depth about cameras, in most cases, the manual is more than enough.


    yeap.

    then after that you can start fiddling with your camera. or you fiddle with your camera while reading the manual
    Photographer in caffeine
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